It’s the Endo of the World as We Know It (But I Feel Fine)

Hello! 

Hope you are doing well. Have you been watching any Hallmark movies? I’ve been binging them as I recover from surgery. They really all are the same, but serve as nice mindless entertainment. You know it’s never going to take a dark turn on you as the happy, pretty, caucasian female protagonist finds love with a small town widower veterinarian who drives a bright red vintage truck. These movies are criticized more as they grow in popularity – and more diversity in casting them would be welcome –  but I find them comfort food at this time. 

Perhaps the reason they are comfort food is because I’m no longer eating actual comfort food. The more I read about Endometriosis and her ugly stepsister, Adenomyosis, the more I believe an anti-inflammatory diet is key to their management. I’m already off the caffeine and alcohol, but kicking sugar at this time of year is a bear. I’ve also decided to go mostly plant-based, lactose-free and gluten-limited. And we already cook around my allergies and my daughter’s fructose intolerance (fructose is in most processed foods, most fruits, and many vegetables including garlic and onion.) Basically, soy-free, egg-free, no red meat, low-FODMAP seems to be the way to go (don’t you just wish you could come to our house for Christmas dinner?)

I have a bunch of new cookbooks and will be trying out endometriosis friendly recipes (now, there’s a sexy title for a cookbook!) over the holidays and into the new year. So far, I’m liking Emma’s Hatcher’s FODMAP Friendly Kitchen Cookbook and the recipes on the FODY company website (they make FODMAP friendly spices and condiments so you don’t have to make your own ketchup.)

As well as diet, it helps to wear more forgiving clothes. I have resisted this my whole life: I am the person who expected to wear skinny jeans out of the hospital when I gave birth. (I was tiny, my baby was huge, and when I did the math, I figured I’d walk out my pre-pregnancy size. My doctor had a good laugh when I left the hospital in the maternity pants I’d worn in.) Last year, I stuffed myself into television appropriate clothes and winced in pain. But I’m a full time writer now. I can dress for comfort. That and having people behave better around me for fear they will otherwise be shamed in the press are the only real benefits of the job. (Actually, getting to be super nosey and get away with it, and meeting interesting new people is the best part!) 

For the few months pre-surgery, I embraced more endo-friendly clothes and have not looked back. 

Pants are the trickiest. Because forgiving-waist-for-bad-days equals people-assume-you-are-ancient-and-adore-weird-coloured-polyester. To avoid that, these are my go-to pants these days:

The Brunette joggers (now on sale). The key is a slim fit top and something short like a waist length puffer or biker jacket. 

Eileen Fisher Pants. Honestly, they are all good. The only problem is the price. Her stores sometimes have sample size stuff for $89 that is great. I have grey wide legged pants (similar) and crushed velvet joggers (similar) that I got for a steal. 

For dresses, any knit dress is great. Brora is divine if you want to bust the budget. Banana Republic and Anthropologie usually have some winners too. Crushed velvet tunic dresses are heroes, especially for the holiday season. For skirt length, I err on the side of short since it’s more flattering on me. Comfort is key, but one can look nice. 

This crinkled velvet tunic is my very favourite. I will weep buckets if something ever happens to mine. I hope Anthropologie brings it back. 

I need to get back to working out at some point. It’s actually kind of a relief now that I have my official diagnoses. For years, I’ve suffered through workouts, certain that if I could just build my core muscles enough, the pain that accompanied crunches would stop. When I get the green light to work out again in January, I will be careful. I’ll work with someone with expertise in this area since the right exercise can help alleviate pain. 

So, diet, non-Voguey clothes, and exercise. Isn’t late-onset endometriosis and adenomyosis fun? Yay for chronic illness (said no-one ever.) But still, I’m lucky. The boards and blogs are quite rattling. I thank the mighty stars I was able to have my kids with light intervention (though don’t let them know, especially right before Christmas, or they will use this knowledge to finagle more Sephora palettes and X-box games.) 

I’m off for a weekend of ascetic eating and sporting loungewear. Do you have any fun plans?

Xx

2 comments

Love to hear from you!